Archive | grammar

There Is a Difference Between ‘Utmost’ and ‘Upmost’

I was writing a sentence the other day that included the sentiment that something was of “the utmost importance.” And I paused. Was it utmost? Or was it upmost? I was pretty sure it was “utmost,” but I was also pretty sure I’d seen/heard “upmost” at some point in my life. What’s the difference? Read more… […]

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Continue Using Apostrophes Correctly, We Beg of You

Those of us who respect and appreciate proper apostrophe usage awoke yesterday to some upsetting news: John Richards, one of the most ardent defenders of the correct use of the apostrophe, is giving up. He posted his reasons for this decision on the website of the Apostrophe Protection Society, an organization he…Read more… Continue Reading […]

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‘Misinformation’ and ‘Disinformation’ Are Not the Same Thing

If the past three years have seemed more like 300, the coming year is really about to test us all. The countdown to the 2020 election is about to begin and we’ve got to prepare ourselves for the onslaught of misinformation and disinformation—and it’s important to know the difference. Because they’re not the same thing.Read […]

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‘Misinformation’ and ‘Disinformation’ Are Not the Same Thing

If the past three years have seemed more like 300, the coming year is really about to test us all. The countdown to the 2020 election is about to begin and we’ve got to prepare ourselves for the onslaught of misinformation and disinformation—and it’s important to know the difference. Because they’re not the same thing.Read […]

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‘Vacay’ Is Now a Real Word, According to Merriam-Webster

Merriam-Webster is at it again, adding hundreds of new words to its English dictionary, a process it refers to as “a happy fact of life for a living language.” We happen to share in their excitement over new words. It is a happy fact, after all, that they’ve finally expanded the definition of they to include […]

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Are You Making These Common Grammatical Mistakes?

No one can recognize our relentless misuse of the English language quite like an editor. Misplace a modifier, and your editor will (hopefully) let you know. Over-use intensifiers such as “very,” “just,” and “really,” and your editor will tell you that you’re really just not doing your writing any favors. My editor…Read more… Continue Reading […]

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Are You Making These Common Grammatical Mistakes?

No one can recognize our relentless misuse of the English language quite like an editor. Misplace a modifier, and your editor will (hopefully) let you know. Over-use intensifiers such as “very,” “just,” and “really,” and your editor will tell you that you’re really just not doing your writing any favors. My editor…Read more… Continue Reading […]

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Are You Making These Common Grammatical Mistakes?

No one can recognize our relentless misuse of the English language quite like an editor. Misplace a modifier, and your editor will (hopefully) let you know. Over-use intensifiers such as “very,” “just,” and “really,” and your editor will tell you that you’re really just not doing your writing any favors. My editor…Read more… Continue Reading […]

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How to Use ‘Affect’ Versus ‘Effect’

Every time I write either “affect” or “effect,” I have to pause for a second to double-check myself. Their meanings are related, their spellings are similar; even their pronunciation is nearly the same. But one of them causes something and the other is the result. And knowing the difference is a good thing. Read more… […]

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Find Examples of Word Use With This Web App

A thesaurus is a fruitful tool when you use it befittingly. If you fathom what you’re performing, a thesaurus patronizes you find the merited word for your specific ballgame. But if you ply synonyms without kenning their shadinesses of gist, you will look really speechless. You need to apprehend each word you utilize,…Read more… Continue […]

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